The double-edged sword of vacation

It’s a tired old tale, but it’s true. Vacation is wonderful, essential, but the frantic work leading up to vacation, the effort to get everything in order so that, hopefully, things won’t fall apart while you’re gone, and then the catch-up game when you get back, threatens to overshadow the vacation itself.

I’ve been of the opinion for years that the problem lies in the dichotomization of our vacation and non-vacation lives. For people who don’t like their jobs, work has become something to be endured between weekends and vacations, rather than something you just do as a normal part of your life. Work, then, becomes something you do in order to earn vacation time, but many Americans are lucky to get 2 weeks of vacation out of 52 weeks in the year.

That’s awfully lopsided.

Even for people who love their jobs, the compartmentalization of vacation and work time still creates this situation where the effort planning for and then cleaning up after a vacation can dilute the very restorative effects that a vacation is supposed to offer.

Then again, I might just suck at time management and this whole theory of mine could be nothing more than a massive rationalization.

My goal today: To protect the following memories from my four-day vacation weekend.

  • Setting out from beautiful Horseshoe Bay on a B.C. Ferry, past Bowen, Gambier and Keats islands, and landing on the Sunshine Coast
  • Arriving at Roberts Creek, a village with a restaurant, cafe, general store, library, and not much else
  • Exploring the coast by car, bicycle and kayak
  • Returning to the mainland for a day in Vancouver, cycling around Stanley Park, swimming, tea, and unexpectedly enjoying a performance by SpandyAndy
  • Time with the family

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