Plastic Christmas Tree Redux

Last week I dissed a 38-foot tall plastic Christmas tree, but today I’m singing praises for a 42-foot plastic Christmas tree, not because it’s taller, but because the former was made of Legos and the latter was made of recycled Sprite bottles.

Now THAT is beautiful, AND it promotes reusing disposable items, AND it’s economically practical:

For a third consecutive year the city of Kaunas, Lithuania approached artist Jolanta Šmidtienė to assist with their annual holiday decorating. Recognizing the city’s somewhat dire financial state the artist challenged herself to build something that wouldn’t rely on any administrative funds set aside for the event.

Here are some more amazing images of it’s construction (via Colossal, Design You Trust):

6 thoughts on “Plastic Christmas Tree Redux

  1. Wow, that is some tree 🙂

    Tomorrow I’ll have my stitches removed, my back is getting stronger every day and I’m slowly walking towards work – some time in January, I hope.

    1. Hey there!

      Nice to hear that your recovery from surgery is going well. I look forward to hearing whether or not your pain and other sciatica symptoms are gone once you recover completely.

      Meanwhile, I’m do a better job keeping up with my core-strengthening exercises, and my symptoms aren’t at the level they were a year ago, when I was first diagnosed and needed painkillers and a cortisone injection.

      Cheers!

  2. Amazing… Many moons ago when I lived in Ireland I was very heavily involved in the Environmental movement .. One year our local group ( of which I was Chairperson) made a very long snake of PET bottles just like these … It was carried by lots of children dressed in black with their faces blacked as well. The snake was held up on poles.. It was wonderfully effective and won a prize at the St Patrick’s Day parade….
    Do I sound like a proud parent 🙂 That’s a bit what it felt like after all the work.. Better still they started to be collected after this publicity and went to be shredded and used as the filling for quilted horse blankets!
    Even prouder of that… It was the early days of recycling.

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