My Post-Election Trumpism-Opposition Begins: Taking It To The Streets

So, in my last post I dusted off Fish & Bicycles and declared my intention to resist the impulse to despair over the barely believable, gulp, election of Donald Trump, and rather, to get to work on being part of a solution.

After an initial round of research, I identified several local social justice groups, as well as a chapter of Our Revolution, the organization that the Bernie Sanders 2016 campaign morphed into, and I’ll be looking into these further and attending meetings soon.

But, my first offline action, this past Friday, was to attend a protest loosely organized around a demonstration that has been taking place on the same street corner here in Bellingham, Washington, save a few gaps here and there, since 1966, the longest running event of its kind in the U.S.

This weekly peace vigil, held every Friday, was the most natural place to find an organized group of people guaranteed to be equally shaken by the election and opposed to the agenda of the man elected. But, rather than the usual relative handful of protesters on just one street corner at Cornwall & Magnolia, as seen in the photo included in this post, this week all four street corners were packed.

fullsizerender7I’d made my own “Love Trumps Hate” sign, and when I arrived I took my place at the street’s edge, where passing cars and my fellow protesters across the street could see me, and with the very first smile from these lovely people and honks from supportive vehicles zooming by, I felt better than I had, by far, since election day.

The signs held by those assembled ran the gamut: peace/anti-war, environmental, reproductive rights, pleas for black, brown, LGBTQ lives, etc. While I had been wondering how or if we could ever really come together and stay together, there we were, with good intentions and shared purpose, a mutual desire to keep hope alive, hope for a more peaceful world in the face of an unimaginable national nightmare.

And yet, standing there with my sign in hand, I experienced some conflicting thoughts and feelings.

As I looked around at the staunch peace vigil veterans who have shown up weekly for years, not just when there’s a headline-grabbing crisis, I felt humbled, ashamed even, inadequate, for not having done much more than preach peace and love casually to friends and family, to write about it on my blog occasionally, a protest here and there, volunteering as a Bernie Sanders delegate, but only at the County Convention, and all those stupid online petitions.

But then, I observed a group, young and old, singing We Shall Overcome, and every single derisive stereotype of hippies and 1960s/70s counterculture came to mind, along with thoughts of how it all seemed for naught, as we have slid so dramatically backward as a country. We shall overcome, my ass!

But then…the music reached my heart, and cynicism and skepticism melted away, and I joined my voice with theirs.

The next song, the hauntingly beautiful Singing For Our Lives, by Holly Near, with the refrain, “We are a gentle, angry people”, sealed the deal.

I was right where I belonged and past inadequacies no longer mattered.

Only action remains important.

 

The World Needs Trump Like A Fish Needs A Bicycle: I’m Back!

love_trumps_hateIt’s a little embarrassing and quite telling that it took yesterday’s election of Donald Trump as the 45th President of the United States for me to finally turn the lights back on here at Fish & Bicycles.

My last post was published way back in August, when I interrupted a string of entries I’d done on lighter subjects — including my Notes From Italy series, which I sadly never finished — to touch on the topic of white privilege in America.

What followed was a confluence of challenging world and life events that consumed me and drained from me any inspiration to write.

Given all that, you’d think that the outcome of the 2016 election would have driven my inspiration even further away, maybe even permanently, but this morning, when I faced the choice of utter despair and retreat vs. heeding the call to get to work on reversing the swing of the pendulum, thanks to a figurative kick in the ass from Mrs. Fish & Bicycles, I chose the latter.

I harbor no illusions that Fish & Bicycles can reverse the pendulum, but for the past 7 years this blog has been my primary vehicle for expressing myself, and as I recommit to the idea that I’m part of the problem if I’m not part of the solution, and to the reality that this is NO time to be silent, it will be very helpful to have this outlet to process and share my experiences along the way.

I’m not yet sure exactly what form my solution work will take. Because I was a passionate Bernie Sanders delegate, it’s tempting to jump on the Our Revolution (the organization that the Bernie 2016 campaign morphed into) bandwagon, but I’ll be researching other progressive organizations as well, both local and national, to identify the top priorities and the best way for me to contribute.

Here at Fish & Bicycles, then, there will be news of successes, setbacks, perhaps the occasional emotional meltdown, and, as often as possible, welcome distractions like my Eyecatchers and Video Fridays series.

So, stay tuned!

The War On (Dominant) White Culture: Revisited

Anti-White-Racism-530px1Back in December, I wrote a post titled The War On (Dominant) White Culture that was selected by WordPress for their curated Discover feed of supposedly best posts of the day, which was flattering for sure.

But what’s much more satisfying to me is something I discovered myself today.

One of my favorite political bloggers, for many years, has been the editor and publisher of TalkingPointsMemo.com (TPM), Josh Marshall.

And while I was rather annoyed by the fact that Josh had the gall (tongue firmly in cheek) to support Hillary Clinton over Bernie Sanders during the primaries, I’ve never stopped reading TPM, his posts in particular, because he is consistently on top of the latest stories and his writing is penetrating and insightful.

So, it was with a degree of pride that I read his post from yesterday, titled Trumpism is a Politics of Loss and Revenge, and noticed that it dovetails nicely with my post from December mentioned above. It draws some of the same conclusions, while providing Josh’s characteristic deeper, more thorough exploration of the topic.

I can’t recommend reading his post enough, but here are just two quotes, one from my post, one from his, that illustrate the overlap of our respective takes on the subject.

…white people have no constitutional or moral right to be the dominant culture, to force their culture on non-white people or demand that non-whites assimilate and adopt white culture.

The only way to remain the dominant culture is through asserting superiority, or some kind of privilege to remain dominant, without regard for the majority, by doing so aggressively and oppressively — think South Africa, where whites were only 20% of the population and yet owned 80% of the land and an even greater percentage of wealth, and resorted to Apartheid to keep it that way.

There is no War on White Culture, but…

…white people do need to let go of being the dominant culture.

–Fish & Bicycles

You don’t need to hate non-whites to be attached to the dominant position whites have historically had in American life. But if you identify with your whiteness, simple majorities mean security. Losing that dominance, if you don’t feel able or ready or willing to relinquish it almost inevitably generates hatred and a desire for revenge.

–Josh Marshall

Notes From Italy, Vol. 6: Botticelli’s Niece

Vol. 6 in my Notes From Italy series.

So, yeah, we were in Florence, visited the Uffizi Gallery, a massive and profound feast of art, and we had the great pleasure to stand right in front of this masterpiece, Sandro Botticelli’s Birth of Venus

Birth_of_venus

… and the very first thought that popped into my mind was:

Oh, the streets of Rome are filled with rubble
Ancient footprints are everywhere
You can almost think that you’re seein’ double
On a cold, dark night on the Spanish Stairs
Got to hurry on back to my hotel room
Where I’ve got me a date with Botticelli’s niece
She promised that she’d be right there with me
When I paint my masterpiece

–Bob Dylan, When I Paint My Masterpiece, 1971

It didn’t matter that Dylan speaks of Rome and this Venus is in Florence, and it didn’t matter — if it wasn’t creepy enough to think of the artist painting nudes of his brother’s or sister’s daughter– that art historians have firmly ruled out that the image of Venus is that of his niece.

Given that Birth of Venus is such an iconic piece, it seems a very good possibility that Dylan was referring to the painting and having a little fun.

So, you might ask, what thoughts did I have about Birth of Venus once the Dylan wore off?

Well, it had nothing to do with how beautiful the painting is, or the mythological story it tells, or what a wonderful composition, with the winds blowing Venus to shore and her handmaiden waiting and ready to clothe her.

No, instead, I thought of Monty Python’s Flying Circus and Terry Gilliam’s brilliant animation:

I know, I’m so highbrow!

Up Next: Notes From Italy, Vol. 7: How To Fake Speaking Italian

Happy 50th Birthday, Revolver!

RevolverWow! The Beatles’ 1966 album Revolver is 50 years old today!

Just two years younger than me, and a masterpiece that has aged very, very well.

I’m in good company!

Lots of great stuff about Revolver out on the interwebs today, on this momentous occasion, so have fun googling.

I mostly really enjoyed Rob Sheffield’s piece in Rolling Stone. He makes a convincing case for the album’s greatness, and offers wonderful historical context, but I have to point out one serious overreach (my emphasis added in bold):

“The Beatles are so confident of their superhuman hipness it doesn’t even occur to them to argue the point, which is how Revolver can sound so arrogant yet so suffused with warmth. If you play “And Your Bird Can Sing” or “Love You To” back to back with “Ballad of a Thin Man” or “Nineteenth Nervous Breakdown,” Dylan and the Stones sound like sophomores trying a little too hard to impress the seniors.”

I’ve never been a big fan of Nineteenth Nervous Breakdown, don’t dislike it, just nowhere near the top of my favorite Rolling Stones songs, so I won’t speak to that.

But, Bob Dylan’s Ballad of a Thin Man, which was recorded a year and three days before Revolver was released, is an epic of confidence, and calling it sophomoric compared to Revolver is a ridiculous insult.

As critic Andy Gill wrote:

“[Ballad of a Thin Man is] one of Dylan’s most unrelenting inquisitions, a furious, sneering, dressing-down of a hapless bourgeois intruder into the hipster world of freaks and weirdos…”

–via Wikipedia

Nonetheless, Sheffield’s homage is otherwise a fun, fun read, so check it out!

 

#ChocolateChipCookieDay

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Notes From Italy, Vol. 5: Miscellaneous One Liners

castle-bolsena
Me and the lovely Mrs. preparing to storm the castle.

Vol. 5 in my Notes From Italy series.

In this installment, something a little different.

As I mentioned in my introductory post for Notes From Italy, my journaling method on this trip consisted of writing down bits and pieces of observations in a running list, rather than in an organized narrative or free writing.

While some of the list items proved ripe for expanding upon, as in the first four volumes of Notes From Italy, others are fun to just read as they are, one (or so) liners, in simple list format.

So, here we go!

1. Not all ragus are created equal. Namely, this:

ragu-commercial

… does NOT, in any way, shape, or form, equal this:

real-ragu

2. The combination of the beating sun and ubiquitous flowers means nearly ubiquitous fragrance wafting through the air, as if there was some machine somewhere pumping out the smell as a kind of tourist attraction.

3. The biggest exception to #2: Italians smoke like chimneys. I’m worried I might need a lung transplant at some point after this trip.

4. Gelato = ice cream, typically VERY good ice cream, but really just ice cream. Everyone loves gelato.

5. The back and side streets of Florence and the Tuscan and Umbrian hilltowns are quintessential old-world Europe in every thoroughly charming way one can imagine.

FullSizeRender(4)
The Mrs., wandering around Bolsena, Italy.

6. You don’t have to be religious to be grateful in the summertime for the old, stone churches, conveniently located nearly every other block or so, with their reliably cool interiors and benches to rest on.

7. Even very cheap wine tastes fantastic in Italy … because Italy.

Leisure Italia
Bottle of red, bottle of white, both about €5 and yummy!

There’s more one liners to come, so stay tuned.

Ciao!

Up Next: Notes From Italy, Vol. 6: Botticelli’s Niece